Books


Observer Quarterly

Observer Quarterly

In the winter of 2015, we launched a new publication called Observer Quarterly. The idea is for each themed issue to include original writing, interviews, and photography alongside archival material that draws a narrative between the history and current condition of new and underappreciated aspects of design culture. Our first issue—the Acoustic Issue—covered new ways of looking at sound as part of the design landscape. The second issue examined tagging as a social, cultural, and indexical practice. And our newest issue—following our conference, Taste, which took place in Los Angeles in the spring of 2016—looks at the multiple intersections between design and food.



Observer Quarterly

Design | The Invention of Desire

Advancing a conversation that is unfolding around the globe, Jessica Helfand offers an eye-opening look at how designed things make us feel as well as how—and why—they motivate our behavior.

More books by Jessica Helfand




How To

How to

How to, Michael Bierut’s first career retrospective, is a landmark work in the field. Featuring more than thirty-five of his projects, it reveals his philosophy of graphic design—how to use it to sell things, explain things, make things look better, make people laugh, make people cry, and (every once in a while) change the world. Specially chosen to illustrate the breadth and reach of graphic design today, each entry demonstrates Bierut’s eclectic approach. In his entertaining voice, the artist walks us through each from start to finish, mixing historic images, preliminary drawings (including full-size reproductions of the notebooks he has maintained for more than thirty-five years), working models and rejected alternatives, as well as the finished work. Throughout, he provides insights into the creative process, his working life, his relationship with clients, and the struggles that any design professional faces in bringing innovative ideas to the world. Offering insight and inspiration for artists, designers, students, and anyone interested in how words, images, and ideas can be put together, How to provides insight to the design process of one of this century’s most renowned creative minds.

More books by Michael Bierut




5050

50 Books | 50 Covers Catalog

The ultimate “book of books” to catalog the 2015 winners of the 50 | 50 competition. Publisher, author, and previous 50 Books | 50 Covers recipient Dave Eggers introduces the book. Photographer George Baier IV, who has photographed countless authors and book jacket projects himself, has thoughtfully taken pictures of every book and cover winner. Mohawk generously donated the finest paper. Printed offset, locally, here in the United States. Copies no longer available.



Observer Quarterly

Massimo Vignelli: Collected Writings

Massimo Vignelli (1931–2014) was one of the most influential designers of the twentieth—and twenty-first—centuries. The work he and his wife Lella accomplished at Vignelli Associates is universally admired. While Massimo himself never wrote for Design Observer, he appeared throughout its pages in spirit and as an example for over ten years. This collection of writings about Vignelli from the Design Observer archives—interviews, memories, observations, and critiques—includes selections from the lively comments and discussions that appeared after the original publication of these pieces. Contributors include Michael Bierut, Jessica Helfand, Debbie Millman, and Alice Twemlow, among others. Get this book!



Persistence of Vision

Persistence of Vision: Collected Writings of William Drenttel

Designer and publisherWilliam Drenttel (1953–2013) was co-founder and editorial director of Design Observer. Since its inception in 2003, Drenttel contributed to Design Observer almost weekly on all manner of topics, from social change to democracy to his early career on Madison Avenue. We’ve collected two dozen essays—originally published on Design Observer—and an introduction by friend and former literary editor of the New Republic, Leon Wieseltier, and put them into print for the first time, including the lively comments and conversations that followed their original publication. Persistence of Vision is not only a tribute to a greatly missed design leader, but serves as an important addition to the design writing canon. Get this book!



Observed | October 17

Gallery: stunning photos of ordinary life in Ukraine‘s conflict zone. [BV]


Observed | October 16

Can the Instagram novel really get more people to read books? (Should it?) [BV]

How do you turn fear into creative fuel? Good Company Magazine is answering that question during a live podcast next Thursday at the New School. [BV]


Observed | October 15

Why is a receipt for cough drops the height of a small child? The long, long history of long, long CVS receipts. [LS]

A new info graphic tool allows users to explore the outlook for upward mobility in their home county (and others’). [LS]


Observed | October 12

A brief memoir of growing up in the library. [BV]

A geyser erupted in Yellowstone and 80 years of human trash poured out. (via Kottke) [BV]


Observed | October 11

AI tech is now good enough to trick us, and the only way we’ll know we’re talking to a bot is because the bot’s creators told it to announce itself.” [BV]


Observed | October 09

In 2018, art, media, and culture are being evaluated for moral correctness more than for quality. The Morality Wars. [BV]

The artist Malevich takes a walk in Vitebsk... [BV]


Observed | October 08

A wonderful new show from WTTW looks into the history of art and design in Chicago. [BV]

Opening tonight: The Reach and Richness of Design, at the Kamerick Art Building University of Northern Iowa featuring Jessica Helfand‘s volvelles, wood type, Ad Reinhardt‘s editorial illustration + more. [BV]


Observed | October 05

Powerful portraits of indigenous women of Siberia aging alone. In the new series Forgotten Like Last Year’s Snow from photographer Oded Wagenstein. [BV]


Observed | October 04

Is “Sans Forgetica” the font of all knowledge? Researchers develop a typeface they say can boost memory. [BV]

Before the end of the year, Apple will open a new store in the Carnegie Library in D.C. Can Apple stores be public spaces? [BV]


Observed | October 03

The life and times of a Japanese candy artist. [BV]

“Art is history.” Netflix reboots Kenneth Clark’s 1969 “Civilisation” series and explores the art of cultures around the world. [BV]


Observed | October 02

In today’s political climate, using satire to record and respond to the current state of affairs is an act of survival. Art as Witness: Political Graphics 2016 – 2018 opens Saturday. [BV]


Observed | October 01

Do we really still need Banned Books Week? (Hint: The answer is, sadly, yes.) [BV]

The existential void of the pop-up ‘experience’: “I went to as many Instagramable “museums,” “factories” and “mansions” as I could. They nearly broke me.” [BV]


Observed | September 28

With the onset of technology, we’re reguarly grappling with how to define a book. But this is nothing new, the question of what sort of object might count as a book remains very much up for debate. [BV]


Observed | September 27

Change everything you hate about meetings with one single word. [BV]

David Hockney + iPad = stained-glass window in Westminster Abbey. “The Queen’s Window”, celebrates Elizabeth II’s reign. [BV]


Observed | September 26

A marvelous sound machine inspired by a Soviet deep drilling project. (via Blake Eskin) [BV]

Of course you know Gutenberg invented movable type, but what else do you know about the history of printing? [BV]


Observed | September 25

Our present era could easily be described as one of fear. In these times, horror has been experiencing what critics feel obliged to label a ‘golden age’. [BV]


Observed | September 24

The future of humanity depends on design ethics. [BV]

“No logo, no liftoff”: Why NASA needs a new logo. (via James I. Bowie) [BV]


Observed | September 21

Tomorrow is museum day in the US! Get your free tickets here. [BV]


Observed | September 20

6,240 photos taken across a 155 degree view over 24 hours = 24 Hour London: the biggest ever time-lapse of London’s skyline, taken from the roof of Canary Wharf’s One Canada Square. [BV]



Jobs | October 17